SENSORY INTEGRATION

Sensory processing disorder is a condition in which the brain has trouble receiving and responding to information that comes in through the senses.

Some people with sensory processing disorder are oversensitive to things in their environment. Common sounds may be painful or overwhelming. The light touch of a shirt may chafe the skin.

Others with sensory processing disorder may:

  • Be uncoordinated
  • Bump into things
  • Be unable to tell where their limbs are in space
  • Be hard to engage in conversation or play

We have heard many anecdotes exemplifying the unique struggles with a sensory processing deficit. They range from the simplest of items, to debilitating issues. Sensory processing disorder may affect one sense, like hearing, touch, or taste. Or it may affect multiple senses. And people can be over- or under-responsive to the things they have difficulties with.

Like many illnesses, the symptoms of sensory processing disorder exist on a spectrum. We work with the child to overcome these sensitivities and learn ways of coping.

“Eating is awful. She won’t try anything new and will only eat certain foods.”

“Whenever his brother cries, he says that it hurts his ears.”

“Socks and clothing are really difficult for him to be comfortable in.”

“Smells and loud noises bother her.”

“She often walks on her tip-toes whenever she’s excited.”